It won’t come as a big surprise if I tell you that communication can fix so many problems that we have in our lives (especially in terms of human resources). Whether these issues are personal or at work, solid communication can make all the difference. In a work environment, there are a great deal of different personalities: loud, quiet, funny, shy, demanding, sweet, and maybe even scary. With a range like that of personalities, it can be difficult to navigate how to effectively communicate with your co-workers and employees.

Communication puts an emphasis on working together and collaborating. Without this collaboration, Society for Human Resources Management Writer Rita Barreto Craig states, “Even if you have the best services or products in the world, if you don’t have the right people to make it, sell it or to help with running the organization, those services and products will be far less valuable.” She adds that by creating a collaborative and communicative environment, you are adding value to your product, company, and brand.

Craig writes that by having a successful line of communication within your company and culture, you can improve on the following:

  • Connecting aligns goals
  • Training confirms expectations
  • Strategies uphold progress
  • Collaboration supports relationships
  • Encouragements sustains passion
  • Communication improves understanding
  • Support accelerates profitability

While we all want to improve our company culture and communication abilities, it’s important to learn how your co-workers and employees best communicate and understand. What might work for some might not work for others or maybe you need to work on your communication skills as a leader.

Sometimes, personality tests help in knowing how someone best processes information and communicates it. It’s likely you have taken one before, and it told you how you best communicate. Consider asking your co-workers and employees if they have or if they would be interested in doing so.  It’s a easy and simple way to understand others better and ultimately, help your company, product, and culture.

Communication stems from not only verbally, but also in body language. Forbes Staff Writer Susan Adams interviewed business Author Karen Friedman on best communication practices in the office. Adams writes that Friedman asserted, ““It’s not just your words that convey a message…It’s all of you.” If you slouch, jam your hands into your pockets, shuffle your feet and avoid eye contact, people will get the impression you don’t want to communicate with them. Pry your eyes and thumbs away from your electronic devices, she admonishes.”

There are a great deal of resources for companies or individuals struggling with communication in the office. When it comes to these kinds of issues, the solution might be a quick fix or it might take some work, but the results will be worth it.