Linkedin Trends

Every year, its important for businesses to reevaluate their recruitment strategies and tactics. New trends continually reshape the talent landscape constantly; so you don’t want to be the dinosaur left in the stone age using prehistoric tactics to find the best talent. Adapting to these changes are critical to any organizations success. But finding the right talent for the right job is easier said than done if its a rare or highly technical role with not that many potential prospects to choose from in the first place.

Linkedin has become the premiere place online for professionals connecting, sponsoring, recruiting, recommending, and everything else that encompasses modern HR. Mostly known for connecting with others as more of a social media hub, Linkedin has dramatically expanded in recent years to now being one of the premier online job boards. With the versatility and visibility it provides for job seekers and providers, Linkedin can become the hub for any employer or job seeker running a new search for a potentially perfect fit.

It was only a matter of time before social media wiggled its way into the world of actual employment. Connectivity means everything nowadays and Linkedin has taken a firm grasp on this concept. Who knows, in a few years some other social media platform could come along and replace LinkedIn altogether, but for now we must acknowledge the trends that are very active in the Linkedin world.

Here are 7 hiring statistics Linkedin found out that any HR pro, recruiter, or hiring manager would want to know.

1. 70 percent of the workforce are passive candidates. – A passive candidate isn’t actively seeking and is gainfully employed, but it doesn’t mean they wouldn’t be open to an opportunity if it presented itself in an attractive way. An active Linkedin user would give notice if you present your organization in an intriguing way.

2. The #1 reason people change jobs is “career opportunity.” – An I.T. pro can be an I.T. pro anywhere. The difference is in the organization and the opportunity to learn something new, grow professionally, and in-turn advance their career. The experience should be a big part of your marketing efforts and be highlighting why growth and advancement are attainable in the role.

3. Compensation, development, and the work/life balance are the top factors. – These are the top 3 most important things too, well, everyone. You need to define and articulate the details around these 3 elements in the recruiting process. It’s better to present these on the table, rather than having a candidate having to ask about them.

4. The #1 job discovery method is referrals. – Word of mouth and asking your own staff might help find someone in the same line of work, as they say, “birds of a feather, flock together.”

5. Leveraging employee networks – Going along with #4, tapping into employee networks can dramatically help gain new prospect visibility by asking your staff to share and post online job descriptions and company culture.

6. Website & Social Media for strong branding. – The stronger and more active a company is about its brand, the more likely they’ll attract the right talent. People today will judge you for how active and strong your online presence/brand is in your respected community. Ask yourself, are you a follower or an influencer?

7. Talent likes constructive feedback – Being open about what you’re looking for straight off the bat is best practice. If you pose a question during the interview process and the candidate simply cannot come up with a reasonable answer or solution to your proposed problem, then they are not the right fit. Also if they are persistent but your organization knows they wouldn’t be a fit, its best to deliver the bad news versus letting something linger on and leaving the candidate with false hopes or added confusion to the situation.

As for sourcing technology, web trends, and candidate behaviors, these things change with the times and so should your recruitment strategies accordingly. These 7 key metrics from Linkedin highlight the importance of changing with the tides, and in 10 years, this very same conversation will go completely different; we’d all have to assume.